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Kaisar-i-Hind Medal

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The Kaisar-i-Hind Medal for Public Service in India was a medal awarded by the Emperor/Empress of India between 1900 and 1947, to "any person without distinction of race, occupation, position, or sex ... who shall have distinguished himself (or herself) by important and useful service in the advancement of the public interest in India."
The name "Kaisar-i-Hind" ({{lang-ur qaisar-e-hind, ) literally means "Emperor of India" in the Hindustani language. The word kaisar, meaning "emperor" is a derivative of the Roman imperial title Caesar, via Persian (see Qaysar-i Rum) from Greek Καίσαρ Kaísar, and is cognate with the German title Kaiser, which was borrowed from Latin at an earlier date.See Witzel, Michael, "Autochthonous Aryans? The Evidence from Old Indian and Iranian Texts", p. 29, 12.1 PDF Based upon this, the title Kaisar-i-Hind was coined in 1876 by the orientalist G.W. Leitner as the official imperial title for the British monarch in India.B.S. Cohn, "Representing Authority in Victorian India", in E. Hobsbawm and T. Ranger (eds.), The Invention of Tradition (1983), 165-209, esp. 201-2. The last ruler to bear it was George VI.https://www.google.com/books?q=%22kaiser+i+hind%22&btnG=Nach+B%C3%BCchern+suchen
Kaisar-i-Hind was also inscribed on the obverse side of the India General Service Medal (1909), as well as on the Indian Meritorious Service Medal.:File:India General Service Medal 1909 G5-v1.jpg

History

Empress of India or Kaisar-i-Hind, a term coined by the orientalist G.W. Leitner in a deliberate attempt to dissociate British imperial rule from that of preceding dynasties was taken by Queen Victoria from 1 May 1876, and proclaimed at the Delhi Durbar of 1877.
The medal was instituted by Queen Victoria on 10 April 1900. The name translates as "Emperor of India" (a name also used for a rare Indian butterfly, Teinopalpus imperialis). The Royal Warrant for the Kaisar-i-Hind was amended in 1901, 1912, 1933 and 1939. While never officially rescinded, the Kaisar-i-Hind ceased to be awarded following the passage of the Indian Independence Act 1947. The awards of the gold medal were often published in the London Gazette, while other classes were published in the Gazette of India.

Medal grades and design

The medal had three grades. The Kaisar-i-Hind Gold Medal for Public Service in India was awarded directly by the monarch on the recommendation of the Secretary of State for India. Silver and Bronze medals were awarded by the Viceroy. The medal consisted of an oval-shaped badge or decoration in gold, silver or bronze with the Royal Cipher and Monarchy on one side, and the words "Kaisar-i-Hind for Public Service in India" on the other. It was to be worn suspended from the left breast by a dark blue ribbon. The medal has no post-nominal initials.
Its most famous recipient is Mohandas Gandhi, who was awarded the Kaisar-i-Hind in 1915 by The Lord Hardinge of Penshurst for his contribution to ambulance services in South Africa. Gandhi returned the medal in 1920 as part of the national campaign protesting the Jallianwala Bagh massacre and in support of the Khilafat Movement.

Notable recipients

Gold medal
  • Sardar Khan Bahadur Mir Abdul Ali, JP, Bombay, 9 November 1901
  • Dr Margaret Ida Balfour, Scottish doctor and campaigner for women's medical health issues
  • Dr Mary Ronald Bisset, Scottish physician and missionary for women's medical health.
  • Florence Mary Macnaghten, British - Scottish CMS nurse / in charge of the Canadian Zanana Mission Hospital at Kangra, Punjab, India, for 1905 earthquake relief work and for women's medical health.
  • Richard Burn, for famine services in 1907–08"BURN, Sir Richard", in Who Was Who, A & C Black, online edition, Oxford University Press, 2014; retrieved 27 May 2014.
  • Shankar Madhav Chitnavis, Esq., Deputy-Commissioner, Central Provinces, 9 November 1901
  • Major General Thomas Arthur Cooke, for distinguished service in the advancement of the interests of the British Raj
  • The Lady Curzon of Kedleston, for distinguished service in the advancement of the interests of the British Raj
  • Major Herbert Edward Deane, R.A.M.C., 9 November 1901
  • Major Thomas Edward Dyson, MB, CM, Indian Medical Service, 9 November 1901
  • Mrs E J Firth, of Madras, awarded medal on 9 November 1901 for distinguished service in the advancement of the interests of the British Raj
  • Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (returned 1920)
  • Major General Sir William Forbes Gatacre, chairman of the plague committee of Bombay City 1896 and 1897
  • N S Glazebrook, Esq., JP, of Bombay, 9 November 1901
  • Very Rev John A. Graham, D.D., for distinguished service in the advancement of the interests of the British Raj
  • Thomas Holderness, for distinguished service in the advancement of the interests of the British Raj
  • Sydney Hutton Cooper Hutchinson, Esq., AMICE, Superintendent of Telegraphs, 9 November 1901
  • The Rt Hon. Alice Isaacs, Marchioness of Reading
  • Reverend William Henry Jackson of the Blind School, Kemmendine, Rangoon, awarded the gold medal for public services in India, 1930.
  • Colonel Sir Samuel Swinton Jacob, KCIE, Indian Staff Corps, 9 November 1901
  • Hakim Ajmal Khan, physician and one of the founders of the Jamia Millia Islamia University
  • Taw Sein Ko, for distinguished service in the advancement of the interests of the British Raj
  • Harrington Verney Lovett, Esq., Indian Civil Service, 9 November 1901
  • Elizabeth Adelaide Manning, awarded the medal in 1904 for distinguished service in the advancement of the interests of the British Raj
  • Sir Francis William Maclean, for distinguished service in the advancement of the interests of the British Raj
  • Herbert Frederick Mayes, Esq., Barrister-at-Law, Indian Civil Service, 9 Nov 1901
  • Lieutenant-Colonel James McCloghry, FRCS, Indian Medical Service, 9 November 1901
  • Miss Eleanor McDougall, awarded Medal of the First Class in June 1923 for her work as Principal of the Women's Christian College, Madras
  • A Donald Miller, MBE, (1939) for work with the Leprosy Mission 1921-1942https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/afec/d7adda88563ab8907a2cf916e8b3c98ca265.pdf
  • Rev Charles Henry Monahan, awarded Medal of the First Class in February 1937 for his work as General Superintendent, Methodist Missionary Society, Madras
 
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