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Reference desk Archives Miscellaneous 2019 September 21

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= September 21 =

boiled rat

Apparently rat-on-a-stick is a thing. Given that, just how big a health problem is boiled rat likely to be? Would the hazard come from infections the rat might be carrying, toxins such as pesticides/rodenticides, or what? Just wondering, not looking for recipes. Thanks. 67.164.113.165 (User talk:67.164.113.165talk) 02:17, 21 September 2019 (UTC)
If boiled long enough, it should be sterile, but since it was in soup, it may not have been boiled long enough, especially if it just fell in. So, if you actually ate the rat, disease would be a concern. And yes, several poisons used for rats are also harmful to people, but unless you actually ate the rat, I doubt if you'd get much effect from the soup. First, only a small portion of the poison would transfer to the soup, and second it would be rather diluted by the soup, and third, the mass of a person is so much greater than a rat that it would take far more poison to have an effect. So, quite unlikely to be dangerous, just seriously gross. SinisterLefty (talk) 03:32, 21 September 2019 (UTC)

Thanks. I guess I'd try to not freak out too much then. "Waiter, there's a fly in my soup!" except it's a rat, but most of the usual responses should still work. I still wonder how the rat in the bowl made it out of the kitchen, and always suspect the restaurant patron of bringing it themselves. 67.164.113.165 (talk) 07:23, 21 September 2019 (UTC)

:"Waiter, what's this fly doing in my soup ?" ... "Looks like the backstroke, sir." SinisterLefty (talk) 18:24, 21 September 2019 (UTC)

::

Suddenly dog meat seems appetizing by comparison. ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 21:08, 21 September 2019 (UTC)

This is a nice way to kill two birds, or rats, with one stone. Too many rats + hungry people = ...
Here in the US, we have hungry people and too many Presidential candidates. Hmmmm. SinisterLefty (talk) 21:25, 21 September 2019 (UTC)

: You guys should learn to eat guns. Poveglia (talk) 19:52, 22 September 2019 (UTC)

::I'm going to assume you didn't mean to suggest we kill ourselves: SinisterLefty (User talk:SinisterLeftytalk) 20:04, 22 September 2019 (UTC)

:Kill a rat with a stone, then eat it? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XcDfWj3Sek0 Poveglia (talk) 19:50, 22 September 2019 (UTC)

SinisterLefty's guess about toxicity is wrong and dangerous information. Although a typical rat is over a hundred times smaller than a typical adult human, a rat-lethal dose of bromadiolone, for instance, is greater than the human-toxic dose: Bromadiolone, a commonly used poison in lethal rat-treats, also takes up to five days to kill a rat, and typically over a day for the rat to even show symptoms, so it may not be obvious the rat has been poisoned. Someguy1221 (User talk:Someguy1221talk) 21:55, 21 September 2019 (UTC)
Rats: if you can’t beat them eat them!, Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 2015.

Epidemiology of Leptospira Transmitted by Rodents in Southeast Asia, PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2014.

Leptospirosis, also known as "rat catcher's yellows" has to be the main bio-hazard associated with rats.

Alansplodge (talk) 21:10, 22 September 2019 (UTC)

:Since the reply was indented to me, then I'll say in case it was intended for me, that I was only referring to the specific claim that it was safe to eat a poisoned rat. I'd hope that rats intended for human consumption are raised in captivity, rather than scooped up off the street. Someguy1221 (talk) 09:21, 24 September 2019 (UTC)

::Then you'd have animal rights activists complaining about caged rats vs. "free-range" rats. ←Baseball Bugs What's up, Doc? carrots→ 13:25, 24 September 2019 (UTC)

::If you were referring to my comments, I specifically said that eating the boiled rat was unsafe, both from the POV of disease and poison. You must have been confused when I said that the soup would probably not be dangerous, considering the small amount consumed before the rat was discovered, and the small amount of poison, heavily diluted, transferred to the soup from the rat. SinisterLefty (talk) 13:48, 24 September 2019 (UTC)

:::Depends on how recently the rat has eaten. Rat bait is so poisonous it could easily vomit a toxic dose into a pot of soup. Someguy1221 (talk) 22:15, 24 September 2019 (UTC)

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